The Attic (a name which commemorates our first physical location) is, first and foremost, a site for the research students of the School of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester: a virtual community which aims to include all students, be they campus-based and full-time, or distance-learning and overseas. But we welcome contributions from students of museum studies - and allied subject areas - from outside the School and from around the world. Here you will find a lot of serious stuff, like exhibition and research seminar reviews, conference alerts and calls for papers, but there's also some 'fluff'; the things that inspire, distract and keep us going. After all, while we may be dead serious academic types, we're human too.

Tuesday, October 31, 2006

Journal: Museums and Social Issues

From H-Museum:

Museums & Social Issues Fall 2006, Vol. 1, No. 2
A Culture of Sustainability
Co-Editors: Kris Morrissey (University of Michigan) & Douglas Worts (Art Gallery of Ontario)
-------------------------------------------------------
CONTENTS:
Fostering a Culture of Sustainability, by Douglas Worts
Models ofSustainability: Museums, Citizenship, and Commonwealth, by Terry Link A Sustainable Academy: The New California Academy of Sciences, J. Patrick Kociolek
Thinking Like a System: Are Museums Up to the Challenge? Glenn C. Sutter
Sustainability Needs Cultural Learning by Yudhishthir Raj Isar
Ecomuseology and Sustainable Development, Hugues de Varine
Twenty-first Century Strategies for Sustainability, Hazel Henderson
Why Should I Care? Jon Hawkes

Book Reviews
Looking Reality in the Eye: Museums and Social Responsibility, edited byRobert Janes and Gerald T. Conaty reviewed by George E. Hein
A Short History of Progress, by Ronald Wright reviewed by Ellen Hirzy

Exhibit Review
The Green House: New Directions in Sustainable Architecture and Design, National Building Museum reviewed by Julie A. Avery and Stephen Lee Stier

Resources
Resources for A Culture of Sustainability Wendy Ng
--------------------------------------------------------------
Museums & Social Issues
Issue ISBN: 1-59874-883-1 / 978-1-59874-883-3
Journal ISSN: 1559-6893
Price information available on the website: www.LCoastPress.com

Upcoming 2007 issues: Spring 2007 (Vol.2:1): What is Race? Co-Edited by Kris Morrissey and Gretchen Sorin Sullivan / Issue ISBN: 978-1-59874-992-2Fall 2007 (Vol. 2:2): Is Civic Discourse Still Alive? Co-Edited by Marjorie Schwarzer and Judy Koke/ Issue ISBN: 978-1-59874-993-9

To purchase a copy of this issue or subscribe, contact Left Coast Press, Inc. 1630 N. Main Street, #400, Walnut Creek, CA 94596/ phone &fax: (925) 935-3380 / Web: www.LCoastPress.com / email: journals@LCoastPress.com

Journal: Early Popular Visual Culture

From H-ArtHist:

Early Popular Visual Culture
Volume 4 Number 3/November 2006

This issue contains:

TRADITIONS OF COLLECTING AND REMEMBERING: Gender, class and the nineteenth-century sentiment album and photographic album<http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=J355086182066584>p. 227

Andrea Kunard 'THEY GO TO SEE A SHOW': Vicissitudes of spectating and the anxiety over the machine in the nineteenth-century science museum<http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=L76QG11531113754>p. 245

Alison Griffiths DE FOREST PHONOFILMS: A reappraisal*<http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=P21V773826673504>p. 273

Leo Enticknap SELLING SHADOWS AND SUBSTANCE: Photographing Race in the United States,1850-1870s*<http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=VM5K173564R4354N>p. 285

Mandy Reid KIDDING THE KAISER: British propaganda animation, 1914-1919<http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=Q1V0MQ3425675483>p. 307

David HuxleyARCHIVE FEATURE<http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=T28782561104551P>p. 321

If you are not a current subscriber to this publication, you can request a free sample issue here<http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk/link.asp?id=csi;112880>

.http://journalsonline.tandf.co.uk

Monday, October 30, 2006

Research Seminar: Representing the people's stories



The Department of Museum Studies' Research Seminar programme for 06-07 got underway today with a very interesting talk - Representing the people'’s stories: community, memory and the museum - by Liz Carnegie from the University of Sheffield.

Liz raised lots of questions about the role of so-called 'People's Museums' and their counterparts in post-Communist Eastern Europe, in the creation and mediation of collective memories and identities, the privileging of radical, politicised history over domestic 'ordinary' experience, and the 'othering' of the working classes by museum-going audiences.

Photos

1. Liz Carnegie

2. Viv doing the introductions, while Anna surreptitiously uses the wrong mug ;)

Sunday, October 29, 2006

What is art?

During the MA tutorials the other day, I was talking to the students about what makes something art, but overlooked perhaps one of the most obvious characteristics: the context in which it is displayed. Here's a little article (that traditionalists might find a little provocative) about the pervading influence of the dreaded 'popular culture' at our cultural institutions. ;)

Saturday, October 28, 2006

CFP: Seminars in the History of Collecting 2007

From ArtLine:

The Wallace Collection, Seminars in the History of Collecting 2007
Call for Papers

The seminar series has been established as part of the Wallace Collection's commitment to the research and study of the history of collections and collecting, especially in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in Paris and London.We are keen to encourage contributions covering all aspects of collecting, including:

-Formation and dispersal of collections
-Dealers, auctioneers and the art market
-Collectors
-Museums
-Inventory Work
-Research Resources

The seminars, which are bi-monthly, act as a forum for the presentation and discussion of new research into the history of colllecting. Seminars are open to curators, academics, historians, archivists and all those with an interest in the subject. Papers are generally between 20 and 40 minutes long and most seminars take place at the Wallace Collection.

Proposals should be submitted by Friday, 17 November 2006. For more information please contact:
Sophie Carr, Assistant Curator
The Wallace Collection
Hertford House
Manchester Square
LondonW1U 3BN
Tel: 0207 563 9515
E.mail: sophie.carr@walllacecollection.org

Friday, October 27, 2006

Human remains

That last post has made me think about the issue of displaying human remains in museums. Personally, it's something I'm not very comfortable with. Apart from the ghoulish aspect (eek! A dead body!), I feel it's very disrespectful. Blame it on my church schooling! ;)

I remember visiting the Egyptian galleries at the BM a few years ago, already feeling a tad apprehensive (that scene, where all the mummies awaken from 'The Mummy Returns' was playing on my mind!), and coming across a frankly disturbing scene: A group of tourists crowded around a case, having photos and taking video of a body mummified naturally in sand...and smiling...and making V signs. It upset me. It didn't seem appropriate.

I would have no problems with being dug up in the distant future and studied, providing I was quietly re-interred somewhere and left in peace after my bones had revealed their secrets, to benefit understanding of culture and society in the twenty-first century. I would not want to either i) spend eternity being gawped at in a museum or, ii) sitting in a box on a shelf in a storage unit.

These things bother me!! I can't be the only one...

A few conference alerts and CFPs and other stuff for Friday morning...

From H-Museum:

Civilisation and Enlightenment: the Arts of the Meiji period
Victoria and Albert Museum, Gallery 45, Japan (Toshiba Gallery)
20 October 2006 - 30 April 2007

The symbiosis between Western modernity and Japanese tradition during the Meiji period (1868-1912) was summed up in the Japanese phrase Bunmei Kaika -Civilisation and Enlightenment. In recent years world-wide interest in the arts of the Meiji period has significantly increased, not least in Japan itself where art works of this period are beginning to receive the academic and public acclaim which many curators and specialists have long felt they deserved.This autumn the V&A is presenting a new display from its rich collections of works from the Meiji period, many of which were collected at that time and some of which have not been on public display for years. Visitors to the V&A will have the opportunity to see objects produced and collected during a period when Japan and the West contributed cross-culturally to the applied and decorative arts, often to astonishing effect.To coincide with this new display the Museum has invited speakers who are at the forefront of studies in the arts of this period to talk at a Study Day on 11 November 2006.
http://www.vam.ac.uk/activ_events/courses/study_days/index.html

The speakers are Victor Harris, Emeritus Keeper, British Museum; GregoryIrvine, Victoria and Albert Museum; Dr Clare Pollard, Ashmolean Museum,Oxford: Tim Clark, British Museum; Dr Nicole Rousmaniere, SainsburyInstitute for the Study of Japanese Arts Cultures and Shaun Garner,Russell-Cotes Museum.

Tickets for this event will be available from the V&A Bookings Office:+44 (0)20 7942 2211 or bookings.office@vam.ac.uk

***
Respect for Ancient British Human Remains: Philosophy and Practice
Manchester Museum
Friday 17th November 2006

A conference organised by The Manchester Museum (University of Manchester) and Honouring the Ancient Dead, supported by the Museums Association

It is becoming standard practice for UK museums to repatriate human remains to their originating communities in Australasia and North America for reburial. An emerging issue, hotly debated, concerns the British counterparts of those remains: the communities for whom they are important are advocating with museums and archaeologists for respectful treatment, storage and sometimes reburial of ancient British human remains, both those recently excavated and those accessioned long ago and held in museum stores.The rationale for archaeologists excavating human remains, and museums collecting, studying and displaying them, is that they contribute to understanding of human history and that their analysis advances scientific knowledge in various fields. But the rights of science, archaeology and museums to use dead bodies as a research and teaching resource are not universally accepted. For many communities, human remains are sacred, they contain the stories of individuals, peoples, and landscapes. From that perspective, they must be treated with respect, and some question their use as objects of scientific investigation at all, or at the very least their continued storage in museums once research has been undertaken.Museums and archaeologists are beginning to engage with various communities in the UK who experience the world in different ways, particularly pagan faith traditions, who feel an unbroken ancestral connection with ancient human remains and their landscapes, and are demanding respectful treatment for those remains. As a result, the assumptions, approaches, and practices of museums and archaeologists are being challenged and changed. In response, and in consultation with those communities, some museums are amending their policies and treatment of ancient British human remains, and in some instances reburying or seriously considering reburial.This conference explores ideas of the sanctity of the human body and arguments for what constitutes respectful treatment within a robust philosophical, cultural and ethical framework. It offers practical guidance for museums and archaeologists on consultation, appropriate storage and treatment, and the process of reburial.

Issues examined are:
• Different ways of experiencing and understanding the world and humanity’s position within nature, and their implications for the meaning and treatmentof human remains
• Cultural attitudes towards sanctity of the human body
• A critique of the attitude and practice of western archaeology towards human remains, using bog bodies as a case study
• Analysis of pagan views of the sanctity of burial
• Do modern pagan communities have a claim to be consulted and heard?
• Are the age and cultural background and connections of human remains relevant?
• Museum practices and processes regarding human remains
• The benefits of scientific study and analysis of ancient human remains
• A practical guide to respectful treatment, storage and reburial, including consultation, decision-making, funding, location, deaccessioning from museum collections, and associated rituals.

Speakers
The conference speakers are museum directors and curators, archaeologists, academics, and the founder of Honouring the Ancient Dead, a British network organisation set up to advocate for respect towards ancient pagan human remains and related artefacts and create dialogue with museums and archaeologists.

Professor Piotr Bienkowski: Deputy Director, The Manchester Museum, and Professor of Archaeology and Museology, University of Manchester
Dr Jenny Blain: Senior Lecturer in Sociology, Division of Applied Social Science, Faculty of Development and Society, Sheffield Hallam University
Laura Coats: Senior Curator, History, Leicester City Museums
Dr Melanie Giles: Lecturer in Archaeology, University of Manchester
Sarah Levitt: Head of Museums Services, Leicester City Museums
Emma Restall Orr: Head of The Druid Network, founder and council member of Honouring the Ancient Dead
Professor Elizabeth Slater: Garstang Professor of Archaeology, and Dean of the Faculty of Arts, University of Liverpool
Dr Robert J. Wallis: Associate Professor of Visual Culture, and Associate Director, MA in Art History, Richmond the American University in London

Schedule

09.00 Registration and coffee
09.30 IntroductionEmma Restall Orr and Piotr Bienkowski
09.45 Persons, Things and Archaeology: Contrasting World-views of Minds,Bodies and DeathPiotr Bienkowski
10.35 Coffee break
10.50 Cultural Attitudes Towards Sanctity of the Human Body Emma Restall Orr
11.40 Archaeology of Human Remains: Paradigm and ProcessMelanie Giles
12.30 Lunch
13.15 The Sanctity of Burial: Pagan Views, Ancient and ModernJenny Blain and Robert J. Wallis
14.05 Museums and Human Remains: Duty of Care, Consultation, ConsentSarah Levitt and Laura Coats
14.55 Tea break
15.10 The Benefits of Scientific Study and Analysis of Ancient Human RemainsElizabeth Slater
16.00 Respectful Treatment and Reburial: A Practical GuideEmma Restall Orr and Piotr Bienkowski
16.50 Discussionmediated by Emma Restall Orr and Piotr Bienkowski
17.30-18.00 Conference ends. Drinks reception

Conference informations:
There is no conference fee, and coffee/tea will be provided free. If you wish to have a buffet lunch, there will be a £5.00 charge on the day. If you would like further information about the conference, please do not hesitate to get in touch with Piotr Bienkowski on piotrt.a.bienkowski@manchester.ac.uk

To book your place at the conference, please email or telephone: Anna Davey (Events and Marketing Co-ordinator) mailto:anna.j.davey@manchester.ac.uk
0161 275 8788

Thursday, October 26, 2006

A few conference alerts and CFPs for Thursday morning...

From H-Museum:

Call for Papers
JAPAN AND MATERIALITY IN A BROADER PERSPECTIVE
18TH JAPAN ANTHROPOLOGY WORKSHOP (JAWS) CONFERENCE
University of Oslo Museum of Cultural History
March 14-17, 2007

Dear Group Colleagues with a Japan focus,
You are invited to sign up for the next Japan Anthropology Workshop (JAWS) conference in Oslo. The conference addresses the theme "Japan and Materiality in a Broader Perspective." But any other topic as well is equally welcome, whether this would be a proposal for a panel, an individual paper, a special lecture, a media event, or a round table discussion.Contributors to the conference are also invited to approach issues related to Japan from a cross-disciplinary point of view. Students and doctoral candidates are welcome to participate. The inclusive approach to the issue of Japan and materiality may be illustrated by the following possible topics:

* Popular culture: media, film, fashion, commercial culture, food & drink
* Place and landscape: monuments, sights, itineraries, mementos
* The materiality of display: theme parks, museums, games, virtual reality
* Significant objects: tools for identity making, proprietorship, emblems of power and interest
* Inalienable or marketable crafts and skills
* Nature, body, sexuality, and the sacred within the context of tools andtechnology
* The physicality of selfhood: social use of the body

Received submissions will be posted on the conference website http://www.khm.uio.no/jaws-2007/. Some of the already registered panels may be open for additional participants. Please contact the organizer for information on this. Papers submitted as individual presentations will be grouped into thematically coherent panels. You are welcome to address any inquiry to the email address below. Conference communication in Japanese is welcomed.

Email address: jaws-2007@khm.uio.no
Looking forward to seeing you in Oslo next year!
Best regards,
Arne Rokkum--Professor of Social Anthropology
Department of Ethnography
Museum of Cultural History
University of Oslo
P.O. Box 6762
St. Olavs Plass
NO-0130 Oslo, Norway
Tel +47-22859965
Fax +47-22859960
Mobile phone:+47-97711558
http://www.khm.uio.no

***
Call for exhibition projects for
NODEM 06 Award
NODEM 06 Digital Interpretation in Cultural Heritage, Art and ScienceMuseums Oslo, December 7 - 9, 2006

As in earlier conferences NODEM 2006 will have an exhibition space outside the rooms where the keynote sessions, project presentations, and workshops is arranged. Exhibition space is free of charge.The exhibition space will be the perfect place:- to show demonstrations of research project results- to have hands-on experience- to show prototypes of on-going projects- to present institutions and their activities and perspectives- to discuss new collaborations

Exhibition proposals and other inquiries may be sent to:
nodem06-submission@media.uio.no
Deadline for proposals is by Nov 6th.

The NODEM Award for the "Best Design of Digital Experiences in Museums" will be nominated Saturday Dec 8 2006. NODEM 06 have invited following keynote speakers- Liam Bannon, Interaction Design Centre Universitety of Limerick, Ireland- Vince Dziekan, Multimedia and Digital Art, Monash University, Australia- Jørn Hurum, Naturalhistorical Museum, University of Oslo, Norway- Daniel Pletinckx, Visual Dimension, Belgia- Franco Niccolucci, PIN, l'Università di Firenze, Itallia- Nick Ryan, University of Kent -Storbritannia

For information see NODEM 06 website:http://www.tii.se/v4m/nodem
Currently following museums and research institutions are contributing to the program- KIASMA/ Finnish National Gallery, Helsinki, FI- Rovaniemi Art Museum, FI- Cleveland State Uni/Cleveland Museum of Natural History, USA- Reykjavik Art Museums, IS- Reykjavik City Museum, IS- DREAM Syddansk Universitet/Experimentariet, Odense/København, DK- Austagder kulturhistorise Museum, NO- EyeLed GmbH, Saarbrücken, TY- Kulturhistorisk museum, UiO, NO- University of Art and Design, Helsinki, FI- Antenna Audio, NE- Adlib information systems, TYWe hope to see you at NODEM 06 in Oslo as well!

Dagny Stuedahlcoordinator NODEM 06http://www.tii.se/v4m/nodem/index.htm
Department for Media and Communication University of Oslo Postboks 1093 Blindern0317 Oslo.tel. +47 22 85 04 06 mob. 99 72 81 56

Tuesday, October 24, 2006

Boring theoretical stuff made kind of fun!

For those of you, like me, seriously struggling with the dreaded theory, I can recommend www.theory.org.uk. Check out the trading cards, the lego sets and action figures! I love mad stuff like this. :)

Oh, and the 'How to Survive a PhD' is good too.

Conference Alert: FLUX: Art History, Cinema, Classics and Archaeology

FLUX: Art History, Cinema, Classics and Archaeology
Postgraduate Conference
9–10 November 2006
University of Melbourne

The School of Art History, Cinema, Classics and Archeology’s 2006 Postgraduate conference is on the subject of FLUX. With its connotations of flow and fusion, of formation, dissolution and reformulation, FLUX reflects both the interdisciplinary spirit of this year’s conference and the broader status of the humanities within the Australian tertiary sector. FLUX will feature 75 papers by postgraduates from universities across Australia and New Zealand in art history, cinema, classics, archaeology,museology and related disciplines. Additionally, there will be keynote addresses by Prof. Ronald de Leeuw (Director of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam) and Adrian Martin (Senior Research Fellow, Monash University Film and Television). FLUX is a free event. All welcome.

For further information please visit our website: http://www.ahcca.unimelb.edu.au/flux
Or email: ahccapgrads@gmail.com

Ryan Johnston
The School of Art History, Cinema, Classics and Archaeology
Elisabeth Murdoch Building
The University of Melbourne
Victoria 3010
Australia
Ph: + 61 3 8344 5565
Fax: + 61 3 8344 5563
Email: ahccapgrads@gmail.com
Visit the website at http://www.ahcca.unimelb.edu.au/flux

Sunday, October 22, 2006

STOP PRESS! Amazing new photos...




PhD student finds image of Mother Teresa on strawberry. Anna Woodham looked on in amazement as the benevolent visage of the late Albanian nun spontaneously appeared in yogurt, late Sunday evening.

The holy strawberry has been preserved for posterity, and is likely to be auctioned on Ebay to raise funds for the Museum Studies PhD Students' social fund.

Marmart

You either love it or you hate it.

Recent Stuff: Conference Alerts and other bits and pieces...part 3

Both from ArtLine:

TELLING STORIES
A series of symposia to be held at Loughborough University School of Art & Design

Cinematic Essay: Friday Feb 9th 2007

Theories and Criticism: Friday 20th April 2007 - deadline for proposals extended to December 31st

Objects and Narratives: Friday 21st September 2007 ­ deadline for proposals 31st March

New modes of critical writing are challenging conventional expectations of meaning and objectivity through narrative/counter-narrative, authorial presence, style, language, and rhetoric. This development is also present inthe visual arts. This series of symposia will examine the manner and structure of narration across a range of contemporary art practices (e.g.art object, film, photography, criticism). A programme of symposia, screenings, performances, and events will address these preoccupations.Keynote speakers include Martha Buskirk (Montserrat College of Art), Stuart Brisley (artist), John Kear (University of Kent), Yve Lomax (Royal Collegeof Art), Jane Rendell (Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL).

Further details can be obtained from Jane Tormey j.tormey@lboro.ac.uk or Dr Gillian Whiteley g.whiteley@lboro.ac.uk

***
The Arts and Humanities Data Service (Visual Arts) is running a one-yea rresearch project which aims to map advanced digital imaging technologies to the needs of researchers in the visual arts. The project is called The Hunt for Submarines in Classical Art. It is funded by the Arts and Humanities ResearchCouncil (AHRC) and based at the Farnham campus of the University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone and Rochester.You can have your say about art historians’ needs by filling in the online questionnaire at http://www.vads.ahds.ac.uk/submarines-ah.html.Whilst the benefits of digital imaging in the fields of conservation and scientific analysis have been apparent for some time, the advantages that digital imaging can bring to other forms of art-historical research are lesswell-known. For many researchers, it is very difficult to find out about the latest technologies, and how to secure access to them. Equally, scientists may well develop technologies which could benefit research, but be completely unaware of how researchers could exploit them. The project aims to bridge this gap by producing a report and a database which will make a series of connections between these two spheres.If you are a researcher in art history or a related field (e.g. design history,history of architecture, etc.), we would like to hear from you, whether or not you use digital imaging technologies in your research, and whether or not you think it might help you in your research in the future - it will be just as important for us to know that there are no art historical needs as it will be to know that there are many.All the data we receive will be anonymous, unless you decide to tell us your name and e-mail address so that we can send you news of the project’s findings, or let you know if we come across any technologies which we think might help you. We will not use the addresses we gather for any other purpose, although we may use comments submitted in our report and other material, where they will remain anonymous. We may also share anonymous comments with the Methods Network,http://www.methodsnetwork.ac.uk,/ who are working on similar issues.

For more information about the project as a whole, please go tohttp://www.ahds.ac.uk/visualarts/projects/submarines/
Thank you for your time – we look forward to reading your thoughts!

Dr Rupert Shepherd
Researcher, The Hunt for Submarines in Classical Art
AHDS Visual Arts
University College for the Creative Arts at Farnham
Falkner Road, Farnham, Surrey GU9 7DS, U.K.T +44 (0)1252 892721 F +44 (0)1252 892725E rupert@vads.ahds.ac.uk
http://www.ahds.ac.uk/visualarts/projects/submarines/

Recent Stuff: Conference Alerts and other bits and pieces...part 2

From H-Museum:

Masterclasses in Museology
The Museion Research Seminar Series - Autumn 2006

All research seminars will take place on Wednesday afternoons in the Museumof World Culture, Göteborg, Sweden starting at 2.00pm. All talks will be in English.

Wednesday 18 October 2006
Maurizio Maggi
Ecomuseums, heritage and communities - the Italian experience.
Maurizio Maggi is a researcher at the Istituto ricerche economiche e socialidel Piemonte (IRES), in Turin, Italy. Piemonte is a region of northern Italythat has been finding new ways of sustaining its rural communities through agricultural tourism, 'slow food' and ecomuseum development. There are some fifty ecomuseums including 20-25 on the making in the region, many relating to former industries and ways of life.These sites are now making a real contribution to the local economy, and also providing local people with a means of self-expression and ownership oftheir past. Maurizio has been at the heart of this Piemonte museological revolution, not just by helping to establish and support these initiatives, but also by developing a web-based database (www.ecomuseums.eu ) that is a source of information and discussion about ecomuseums and community-based heritage projects, and enabling a Europe-wide network of ecomuseum practitioners. In his talk he will outline some of these developments, but refer in particular to the debates which are currently taking place within the European network.

Wednesday 25 October 2006
Miriam Harte
Re-inventing the open-air museum - the Beamish experience
Miriam Harte is Director of Beamish, England's premier open air museum in County Durham in the north of England. On a large site in a natural bowl inthe landscape, an industrial town that represents the heyday of northern England's industrial might has been re-created, set in the period justbefore the First World War. A range of buildings - a school, church, miners'cottages, colliery buildings, shops and public houses - have been carefully collected and restored on-site.Costumed interpreters act as the main means of communication with visitors.The stories that are told are based on extensive research carried out by the museum, which has magnificent collections of material culture and important photographic collections. Such museums are seen elsewhere in the world, with Skansen in Sweden being cited as the first such development, but they pose all kinds of practical and theoretical problems. How do they remain attractive to visitors if they are relatively static? Can one site encompass more than one time frame? How can such sites appeal to teenagers, who may have little interest in the past? And how do such museums create ac ollecting policy that will serve the museum in the future?Interestingly, Miriam Harte took on the role of Director when many of these questions had not been asked, let alone answered. She has been at the forefront of these discussions, both at Beamish and in ICOM's committee for open air museums, and will describe the museological and professional challenges she has faced in re-creating Beamish.

Wednesday 22 November 2006
Dr Rhiannon Mason
Museums and Nationalism in the 21st century - the case of National Museum Wales
Dr Rhiannon Mason is a lecturer at the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies, University of Newcastle, England. Her research examines the ways in which museums in Wales - and the National Museum of Wales in particular - represent the country and its people. This has inevitably led her to explore the meanings of nationalism, and what role material culture as a representation of the past plays in establishing and sustaining the concept of nation. In her talk she will examine the extent to which national representations in Wales have been shaped by the museums' own specific disciplinary discourses. She will refer to the initial creation of the National Museum of Wales and the thematic selection of disciplines ( art, folk culture, and industrial and maritime history) and to the high-profile, public debates which arose as responses to the museums' collecting and display strategies. She will explore the extent to which national museums have been involved in the articulation and definition of nationhood and national identity within Wales, both in the past and in contemporary society. In particular, she will highlight the challenge facing all today's national museums, not just in Wales; namely that they were formed in the intellectual context of nineteenth-century nationalism but now find themselves situated within a global and sometimes a post-national context. This new context tends to privilege ideas of cultural diversity and hybridity above nationalism. Rhiannon Mason will consider some of the ways that national museums are attempting to address and reconcile this conflict.

Wednesday 29 November 2006
Dr Myra Giesen
Homeland security - repatriation and protection of Native American graves and sacred objects in the United States.
Dr Myra Giesen is a Lecturer in the School of Historical Studies, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, England. Before moving to the UK she worked as a cultural resources professional for the American Department of the Interior. In this capacity, she wrote policy and guidance on the excavation of human remains from federal lands and the repatriation of Native American human remains and sacred objects in the possession of museums. In her talk, she will describe the impacts the American federal law, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), has had on Native Americans, museums, federal agencies and scientists in the United States.She will discuss the curatorial, scientific, and ethical debates that have ensued since the passage of NAGPRA. In additon, she will discuss how consultation has been a critical step in both the repatriation and protection progress.

Wednesday 13 December 2006
Dr Christopher Whitehead
Interpreting art in museums and galleries - curatorial and visitor perspectives
Dr Christopher Whitehead is a Lecturer at the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies, University of Newcastle. Before joining Newcastle University he has practiced as a Curator in the UK and Italy, and was Assistant Professor in Art History and Museum Studies at Harlaxton College and at the University of Evansville, Indiana. His research activities focus on both historical and contemporary museology, his book,'The Public Art Museum in Nineteenth-Century Britain: the development of theNational Gallery', was published by Ashgate in 2005. In his lecture he will focus on the ways in which art, and contemporary art in particular, is interpreted in art museums and galleries, exploring the tensions between the artist, the curator and the needs of the visitor. The ways in which art is interpreted ultimately influences the visitor experience, and Chris will describe the initial findings of his recent research, an investigation of the impact on people's lives of gallery visits and education activities, and how this may relate to the acquisition of cultural and social capital.

For more info, contact Staffan Lundén
Staffan.lunden@museion.gu.se
http://www.museion.gu.se

***

Imperial Curiosity: Objects, Representations, Knowledges
Hobart, Australia
27-29 June, 2007
Alongside economic, political, and strategic motivations, curiosity spurred the spread of empire. This interdisciplinary conference invites scholars and curators to explore imperial curiosity with the University of Tasmania 's Centre for Colonialism and Its Aftermath. We want to bring together those working in various historical, literary, ethnographic, and cultural collections with scholars from diverse disciplines: literary studies, geography, Asian studies, history, indigenous studies, art history,architecture, legal studies, museum studies, gender studies, cultural studies, and anthropology, amongst others.We welcome papers which address the following topics, and others which might surprise us:- Imperial inquisitiveness &/or acquisitiveness- Imperial wonder & awe- Resisting imperial curiosity- The cultural industries of imperialism- Imperial florilegium- Textual economies of curiosity: reading, travels, and travails- Imperial networks and/or the imperial archive- The gendering of imperial curiosity- The psychological terrain of imperial estrangement- Imperial affect (curiosity, fear, awe, pleasure)- Cabinets of curiosities: collecting & classification- The objects of empire- The erotics of empire

250 word abstracts should be submitted using the online submission form no later than 1 December, 2006 and should be accompanied by a 100 word biographical note <http://www.utas.edu.au/arts/imperialcuriosity>.
For moreinformation, emailCAIA@utas.edu.au

Dr Anna Johnston
School of English, Journalism, and European Languages
University of Tasmania
Private Bag 82
HobartTasmania 7001
Australia

Recent Stuff: Conference Alerts and other bits and pieces

Okay, so I know I said I wasn't going to 'blog' for a while, but I've been getting loads of conference alerts and CFPs recently (and I'm feeling MUCH less harrassed now I've worked my way through a 'to do' list over the last couple of days), so thought I should update you all. There's so much, it's going to take a couple or three posts. Here goes...

From H-Museum:

The Feminist Future: Theory and Practice in the Visual Arts
The Museum of Modern Art, New York
January 26 - 27, 2007

This symposium addresses critical questions surrounding the relationship between art and gender, bringing together international leaders in contemporary art, art history, and related disciplines. After the activism of the 1960s and '70s, and the revisionist critiques of the 1980s and '90s, this symposium examines ways in which gender is currently addressed by artists, museums and the academy, and its future role in art practice and scholarship.

Keynote speakers:
Lucy R. Lippard, writer and activist
Anne Wagner, Professor of Modern Art, Department of History of Art,University of California, Berkeley

Panelists:
Ute Meta Bauer, Associate Professor and Director of the Visual Arts Program, Department of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Connie Butler, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings, The Museum of Modern Art
Beatriz Colomina, Professor of Architecture and Director of the Program in Media and Modernity, Princeton University
Valie Export, artist
Coco Fusco, artist and Associate Professor, Columbia University School of the Arts
Guerrilla Girls, Frida Kahlo and Kathe Kollwitz, two founding members of the feminist activist group
Salah Hassan, Professor of Art History and Director of African Studies and Research Center, Cornell University
David Joselit, Professor and Chair, Department of History of Art, Yale University
Geeta Kapur, independent critic and curator, New Delhi
Carrie Lambert-Beatty, Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture and Visual and Environmental Studies, Harvard University
Richard Meyer,
Katherine Stein Sachs CW'69 and Keith L. Sachs W'67 VisitingProfessor, Department of History of Art, University of Pennsylvania
Helen Molesworth, Chief Curator of Exhibitions, Wexner Center for the Arts, Ohio State University
Wangechi Mutu, artist
Griselda Pollock, Professor of the Social and Critical Histories of Art andDirector of Centre for Cultural Analysis, History and Theory, University ofLeeds

Respondents:
Catherine de Zegher, curator and art historian
Linda Nochlin,
Lila Acheson Wallace Professor of Modern Art, Institute ofFine Arts, New York University

Tickets (per day: $12; Museum members $10; students and seniors $5) can be purchased at the Museum lobby information desk and the Film and Media desk.Tickets are also available online at www.moma.org/thinkmodern. An infrared sound amplification system is available for all programs held in the Titus Theaters. The Feminist Future is made possible by The Modern Women's Fund.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Feminist Future Symposium Scholarships
DEADLINE: Monday, November 27, 5:30 p.m. ESTA limited number of stipends to help offset the costs of traveling to attend MoMA's The Feminist Future symposium will be offered to qualified undergraduate and graduate students. Only students traveling from outside the New York/Connecticut/New Jersey tri-state area are eligible. Stipends $500 for students traveling within the United States and Canada (outside ofthe tri-state area), plus one complimentary ticket to both days of thes ymposium$1000 for students traveling internationally (outside the United States andCanada), plus one complimentary ticket to both days of the symposium

Please apply by e-mail to Alexandra_Schwartz@moma.org by Monday, November 27, at 5:30 p.m. EST.Your application must include: A letter of interest from you, outlining how attending the symposium would benefit your studies; your resume or curriculum vitae; a letter of recommendation from an academic adviser or department chair at your home institution. (This recommendation must be emailed directly from the referee to Alexandra_Schwartz@moma.org.) You will be notified of decisions by mid-December. Only electronic submissions will be accepted. No phone calls, please.

Alexandra Schwartz
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel. 212.333.1154
Fax 212.333.1120
Email Alexandra_Schwartz@moma.org
http://www.moma.org

***

From H-ArtHist:

Open Call for Papers
Inferno is a journal that prides itself on the publication of original and innovative research being undertaken by postgraduates across the world. For this issue we invite papers from the disciplines of Art History andMuseum and Gallery Studies on any topic, from all periods and all geographical areas. Shorter notices, exhibition reviews and pieces relating to museum or conservation issues within this subject are also sought.

Articles should be a maximum of 5000 words (including all footnotes) and should be submitted in English. Closing date: 31 January 2007. Articles may be submitted as e-mail attachments in a WORD format to: inferno@st-andrews.ac.uk or by post to: Inferno Editors, School of Art History, University of St Andrews, 9 The Scores, St Andrews, KY16 9AR, Scotland. For further information see our website: http://www-ah.st-andrews.ac.uk/inferno/

Wednesday, October 18, 2006

A temporary hiatus

Dear all,

I'm up to my neck in it at the moment, so have put the blog on hold. Will be back as soon as humanly possible. In the meantime, if anyone had a bit of slack time and would like to contribute to the blog, please let me know! ;)

Amy x

Friday, October 13, 2006

Audio Slideshow: David Hockney

The BBC have produced another of their Audio Slideshows, this time on the Hockney retrospective at the National Portrait Gallery. I really love the way these are presented - with the audio over stills rather than video; very simple, yet engaging. There's something really satisfying about watching these short clips.

One Day in History: National Blogging Event

Organisations like the National Trust and English Heritage have got together to launch the 'History Matters' campaign. As part of the organised events they are encouraging everyone in the country to upload a record of their day on Tuesday, 17th October 2006. The resulting diary entries will be retained at the British Library for posterity and should offer future generations a snapshot of everyday life in 2006. What a fantastic idea! I'll be taking part, how about you?!

Thursday, October 12, 2006

A selection of conference alerts and calls for papers

Have received quite a few conference alerts and calls for papers in the last twenty-four hours of so. A brief description and links to further information, where available, follow.

From H-ArtHist:

Sacred Possessions? Italy and Collecting Religious Art, 1500-1900
A conference organized by the Bibliotheca Hertziana - Max Planck Institutefor Art History and the Getty Research Institute in cooperation with theAmerican Academy in Rome.

The conference will be held at the American Academy in Rome, June 19-21, 2007.

This conference explores the collecting of religious art in and of Italy as a special case within the broader study of collecting. The guiding questions for this endeavor include: How does the religious, devotional, spiritual content of art affect the ways in which it is collected? Do religious significance and/or function in the production of a work of art make a difference in its subsequent collection? What changes - social, confessional, intellectual, political - have had an impact on the collecting of religious art?

Papers should focus on 1) collecting religious art in Italy, or 2) the collecting of Italian religious art elsewhere. We hope that proposals will address a spectrum of periods and themes, such as (but not limited to) the following:* When a work leaves its sacred context, what are the new conditions of its reception and interpretation? How can the commingling of aesthetic and religious meaning be balanced when a work is collected?* To what extent is religious art differentiated as a category by collectors, for example by its placement or mode of display within a collection?* What comprises the category of "religious art" in the context of collecting in Italy? Does cross-cultural, cross-temporal collecting mitigate the religious content of works of art, such as when cardinals acquired antique statues of pagan gods or when representations of Aztec gods in feathers and gold appeared in the collections of popes and princes?* The confessional, social and political upheavals in early modernEurope were transnational phenomena and led to the dispersal and recontextualization of religious art. How was the religious meaning of individual works transformed over the course of these broader historical movements?* With the advent of tourism to Italy, art-lovers joined religious pilgrims in visiting Italian churches. Did this phenomenon transform a church into the imaginary of a collection? Conversely, did a sense of sacrality somehow transfer to public museums as the new temples for devotion to art?

The deadline for proposals is December 1, 2006. Proposals should be submitted for consideration in the form of an abstract no longer than 250 words, and may be in Italian, German or English. Abstracts, as well as a curriculum vitae, must be sent by email to both the Bibliotheca Hertziana -Max Planck Institute for Art History and the Getty Research Institute: Dott.ssa Elisabetta Pastore, secretary, Bibliotheca Hertziana, pastore@biblhertz.it
Katja Zelljadt, Research Associate, Getty Research Institute kzelljadt@getty.edu

***

From H-Museum:

New Directions in Women's Material Culture and Public History
Canadian Museum of Civilization
October 31, 2006, 10:00am to 4:00pm

This one-day workshop, presented by the Archaeology and History Division at the Canadian Museum of Civilization, will address questions related to the study of women and public history in Canada. A series of short discussion papers by participants from a wide range of disciplines (including art history, commemoration of historic sites, museology, archives, archaeology and academia) will be followed by a round-table workshop.

10:00-11:30 Panel 1: Defining and portraying women's material culture and history. What is a women's object? How can we more effectively represent women's history in a public history context?
Sharon Reilly, Manitoba Museum
Dianne Dodd, Parks Canada
Myron Momryk, Library and Archives of Canada, retired
Krista Cooke, Canadian Museum of Civilization
Facilitator: Jennifer Lonergan, Parks Canada

11:30-12:45 Lunch

12:45-2:15 Panel 2: Exploring Women's Lives through Material Culture andPublic History
Laura Brandon, Canadian War Museum
Christina Bates, Canadian Museum of Civilization
Phaedra Livingstone, University of Toronto
Facilitator: Amber Lloydlangston, Canadian War Museum

2:30-4:00 Workshop session: Questions and Future Directions

The workshop's goal is the formation of a professional working group on women and public history. There will be a $20 fee for lunch and registration. Registration and pre-payment required by the 20th of October. Please contact Diane Lalande, Archaeology and History Division at the Canadian Museum of Civilization, P.O. 3100, station B, Gatineau, Québec, J8X 4H2,819-776-8360. All checks should be made out to the Canadian Museum of Civilization. Please contact Rhonda Hinther (Rhonda.hinther@civilization.ca / 819-776-7028) or Krista Cooke (Krista.cooke@civilization.ca /819-776-8366) at the Canadian Museum of Civilization for more information.

***

From H-Museum:

Libraries, Archives, Museums and Popular Culture
Area of Southwest/Texas Popular Culture Assn. & Southwest/Texas American Culture Assn. 2007 Annual Conference
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque & Albuquerque, New Mexico
February 14-17, 2007

For more details, visit the Association's web site at http://www.swtexaspca.org/
The Libraries, Archives, Museums and Popular Culture area solicits paper proposals from librarians, graduate students, library school faculty,collectors, writers, and other aficionados (yes! including people who use libraries, archives, and museums!) of popular culture and information settings of all types! We also encourage proposals for slide shows, videopresentations, workshop formats, and panels organized around common themes. Among previous presentations were an overview of collection development for feminist spirituality, images of librarians in comics and movies, and discussions about petroglyphs and scrapbooks.Some suggested topics:- electronic information-seeking habits- intellectual freedom issues related to popular culture resources- book clubs and reading groups- reports of research studies of popular culture & libraries, archives, or museums- marketing popular culture materials to library, archives, or museum users- collection building and popular culture resources- organization and description of popular culture resources- new media formats and popular culture in libraries, archives, or museums- knowledge management issues- profiles of popular culture resources- and other topics welcome!!!

Send a 200-word abstract to the Area Co-Chairs by November 15, 2006.I nclude your complete mailing address, school or other affiliation, e-mail address, telephone number, and fax number. Graduate students are encouraged to present, and to apply for the graduate paper prizes listed at http://www.h-net.org/~swpca/Awards/awards.htm

Janet Brennan Croft
Head of Access Services
Bizzell Library NW104
University of Oklahoma
Norman, OK 73019-6030
PHONE (405) 325-1918
FAX (405) 325-7618
e-mail: jbcroft@ou.edu

Rhonda Harris Taylor
School of Library and Information Studies
401 West Brooks, Room 120
University of Oklahoma
Norman, OK 73019-6032
PHONE (405) 325-3921
FAX (405) 325-7648
e-mail: rtaylor@ou.edu

Janet Brennan Croft
Head of Access Services
University of Oklahoma Libraries
Bizzell 104NW
Norman OK 73019405-325-1918
Fax 405-325-7618
jbcroft@ou.edu

https://securewebmail.le.ac.uk/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?URL=http://faculty-staff.ou.edu/C/Janet.B.Croft-1/http://libraries.ou.edu/
Editor of Mythlore http://www.mythsoc.org/mythlore.html

***

From H-Museum:

MIGRATIONS
A conference sponsored by the University of Reading and the Classical Reception Studies Network
University of Reading (England, UK)
Friday, April 27, 2007

As globalization and multiculturalism flourish in the modern world, there is an increasing need to understand the nature of cross-cultural encounters, exchanges, and interactions. What happens to peoples and traditions when they come into contact with each other? How useful is it to talk about a clash of civilizations? How can cultures or civilizations connect with each other in ways that are mutually beneficial?Was there a time when demarcations of East and West were less divisive, imposing, and rigid than they seem today? These questions have gained a certain urgency in an era when groups appear to meet and collide with increasing rapidity.It is the aim of this conference to examine cultural encounters from the perspective of the reception of antiquity. The papers in the conference will explore how the reception of the ancient past has informed modern discussions about globalization and cultural contact. While the conference will focus on the modern engagement with the past, it will be limited to no one discipline, however, and will promote work in history, literature, philosophy, visual culture, archaeology, reception studies, and other fields. Among the themes to be addressed are migration, globalization, exile, asylum, and cosmopolitanism.T he Classical Reception Studies Network, a co-sponsor of the conference, is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council(UK). A small amount of funding is available from the CRSN to help graduate students with travel-related expenses for the conference. We will have a workshop format with papers of 20 minutes each. Please send abstracts of about 350 words to Phiroze Vasunia at the address below by December 15, 2006. There is no registration fee. The conference is open to all.

http://www.rdg.ac.uk/classics/

Department of Classics
The University of Reading
Whiteknights
Reading, RG6 6AA
U.K.

Telephone: +44 (0)118 378 8420
Fax: +44 (0) 118 378 6661
Email: p.vasunia@reading.ac.uk

Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Conference Alert: Slavery and Public History

From the H-Museum Network:

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition is pleased to announce it's 8th Annual Fall Conference: Slavery and Public History: An International Symposium
Thursday-Saturday, November 2-4, 2006
Yale University, New Haven, CT

Many historic sites, museums, media, and other public history venues are reluctant to broach the subject of slavery in their programming andexhibits. Nonetheless, using innovative methods that are both thorough andrespectful, curators and educators at historic sites and museums often haveresources to teach this controversial topic in ways that those in thetraditional classrooms do not. Reading the African presence back into the landscape of historic houses and other sites and can give new meaning to oldartifacts, documents and environments, enabling public historians to engage old and new audiences in meaningful ways. At our 8th Annual International Conference we plan to examine how historic sites, museums, and other public history venues have dealt with the topic ofslavery and how public historians have used resources to teach this often difficult topic. Furthermore, we want to uncover what issues public historians across the world have faced when addressing slavery and how their work has been received by others. We also hope to address broader questions about if and why dealing with slavery through public history is important and why slavery is often such a difficult topic for public historians to represent.

For full schedule and to register online, visit the conference website: http://www.yale.edu/glc/publichistory

Conference Alert: Respect for Ancient British Human Remains: Philosophy and Practice

From Ethnomuseums.

N. B There is no conference fee, and coffee/tea will be provided free. If you wish to have a buffet lunch, there will be a £5.00 charge on the day.

Contact Piotr Bienkowski on piotrt.a.bienkowski@manchester.ac.uk for further information.

To book your place at the conference, please email or telephone:

Anna Davey (Events and Marketing Co-ordinator)
anna.j.davey@manchester.ac.uk
0161 275 8788


RESPECT FOR ANCIENT BRITISH HUMAN REMAINS:
PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICE


A conference organised by The Manchester Museum (University of Manchester) and Honouring the Ancient Dead, supported by the Museums Association

Manchester Museum, Friday 17th November 2006

It is becoming standard practice for UK museums to repatriate human remains to their originating communities in Australasia and North America for reburial. An emerging issue, hotly debated, concerns the British counterparts of those remains: the communities for whom they are important are advocating with museums and archaeologists for respectful treatment, storage and sometimes reburial of ancient British human remains, both those recently excavated and those accessioned long ago and held in museum stores.

The rationale for archaeologists excavating human remains, and museums collecting, studying and displaying them, is that they contribute to understanding of human history and that their analysis advances scientific knowledge in various fields. But the rights of science, archaeology and museums to use dead bodies as a research and teaching resource are not universally accepted. For many communities, human remains are sacred, they contain the stories of individuals, peoples, and landscapes. From that perspective, they must be treated with respect, and some question their use as objects of scientific investigation at all, or at the very least their continued storage in museums once research has been undertaken.

Museums and archaeologists are beginning to engage with various communities in the UK who experience the world in different ways, particularly pagan faith traditions, who feel an unbroken ancestral connection with ancient human remains and their landscapes, and are demanding respectful treatment for those remains. As a result, the assumptions, approaches, and practices of museums and archaeologists are being challenged and changed. In response, and in consultation with those communities, some museums are amending their policies and treatment of ancient British human remains, and in some instances reburying or seriously considering reburial.

This conference explores ideas of the sanctity of the human body and arguments for what constitutes respectful treatment within a robust philosophical, cultural and ethical framework. It offers practical guidance for museums and archaeologists on consultation, appropriate storage and treatment, and the process of reburial. Issues examined are:
Different ways of experiencing and understanding the world and humanity’s position within nature, and their implications for the meaning and treatment of human remains
Cultural attitudes towards sanctity of the human body
A critique of the attitude and practice of western archaeology towards human remains, using bog bodies as a case study
Analysis of pagan views of the sanctity of burial
Do modern pagan communities have a claim to be consulted and heard?
Are the age and cultural background and connections of human remains relevant?
Museum practices and processes regarding human remains
The benefits of scientific study and analysis of ancient human remains
A practical guide to respectful treatment, storage and reburial, including consultation, decision-making, funding, location, deaccessioning from museum collections, and associated rituals.


Speakers

The conference speakers are museum directors and curators, archaeologists, academics, and the founder of Honouring the Ancient Dead, a British network organisation set up to advocate for respect towards ancient pagan human remains and related artefacts and create dialogue with museums and archaeologists.

Professor Piotr Bienkowski: Deputy Director, The Manchester Museum, and Professor of Archaeology and Museology, University of Manchester

Dr Jenny Blain: Senior Lecturer in Sociology, Division of Applied Social Science, Faculty of Development and Society, Sheffield Hallam University

Laura Coats: Senior Curator, History, Leicester City Museums

Dr Melanie Giles: Lecturer in Archaeology, University of Manchester

Sarah Levitt: Head of Museums Services, Leicester City Museums

Emma Restall Orr: Head of The Druid Network, founder and council member of Honouring the Ancient Dead

Professor Elizabeth Slater: Garstang Professor of Archaeology, and Dean of the Faculty of Arts, University of Liverpool

Dr Robert J. Wallis: Associate Professor of Visual Culture, and Associate Director, MA in Art History, Richmond the American University in London

Schedule

09.00: Registration and coffee

09.30: Introduction (Emma Restall Orr and Piotr Bienkowski)

09.45: Persons, Things and Archaeology: Contrasting World-views of Minds, Bodies and Death (Piotr Bienkowski)

10.35: Coffee break

10.50: Cultural Attitudes Towards Sanctity of the Human Body (Emma Restall Orr)

11.40: Archaeology of Human Remains: Paradigm and Process (Melanie Giles)

12.30: Lunch

13.15: The Sanctity of Burial: Pagan Views, Ancient and Modern (Jenny Blain and Robert J. Wallis)

14.05: Museums and Human Remains: Duty of Care, Consultation, Consent (Sarah Levitt and Laura Coats)

14.55: Tea break

15.10: The Benefits of Scientific Study and Analysis of Ancient Human Remains (Elizabeth Slater)

16.00: Respectful Treatment and Reburial: A Practical Guide (Emma Restall Orr and Piotr Bienkowski)

16.50: Discussion (mediated by Emma Restall Orr and Piotr Bienkowski)

17.30-18.00: Conference ends. Drinks reception.

Friday, October 06, 2006

Turner Prize 2006: Audio Slideshow (BBC)

BBC News Online has produced a short audio slideshow of the Turner Prize exhibition. Commentary is by Lizzie Carey-Thomas, a curator at Tate Britain. At first glance I'm liking Mark Titchner's work (which isn't surprising really, given my interest in propaganda posters, slogans and visual communication). Worth a look...

Conference Alert/CFP: Repatriation of Cultural Heritage

From Ethnomuseums:

(Trip to Greenland, anyone?!)

More information may be found on the website of The Greenland National Museum & Archives: http://www.natmus.gl/con2007
**********************
Invitation February 2007: Conference on Repatriation of Cultural Heritage

For the last couples of decades the world has witnessed an increasing number of disputes about cultural heritage ownership, and often these disputes result in claims for repatriation. What causes the disputes is the fact that ethnographic, archaeological or physical anthropological collections are often of importance to several parties simultaneously - both to the source community, who claims it by virtue of being the 'culture of origin', and the state, museum or private institution that currently holds the material. Since most of the disputes relate to material appropriated within a colonial or otherwise occupational context, repatriation isn't restricted to having museological implications, but touches upon a wide variety of political, legal, ethical and cultural issues. Owing to the successful repatriation partnership between Greenland and Denmark, the Greenland National Museum & Archives wish to host an international, cross-disciplinary conference on repatriation, addressing all relevant parties: researchers and museum curators, representatives of western governments, 3rd and 4th World populations, UN agencies and other inter- and non-governmental organizations. The aim of the conference is to create understanding and mutual respect between the parties involved, in order to work out solutions and models for collaboration in future repatriation disputes. We wish to invite you to take part in the conference in Nuuk, Greenland from February 13th-February 15th 2007.

Deadline for submitting papers or posters is November 1st, 2006. A number of the contributions will be published subsequently. Deadline for registration is November 15th, 2006. For registering or for further information about the conference see the Greenland National Museum & Archives website www.natmus.gl
Contact person: Mille GabrielMail to: mille.gabriel@natmus.dk

NUNATTA KATERSUGAASIVIA ALLAGAATEQARFIALU
GREENLAND NATIONAL MUSEUM & ARCHIVES
P.O. Box 145
Hans Egedesvej 8
DK-3900
NuukE-mail: mille.gabriel@natmus.dk
Tel: +45 3347 3448
Fax: +45 3347 3322
www.natmus.gl
**********************
Programme Monday 12 February 2007 - Arrival and Evening Reception
Tuesday 13 February 2007 - Conference Session 1. Whose Property / Whose Heritage? The Legal Status of Cultural Heritage Keynote Speakers:· Catherine E. Bell, Professor of Law, University of Alberta, Canada· Timothy McKeown, Program Coordinator, National NAGPRA Program, USA· Guido Carducci, Chief of International Standards Section, Division of Cultural Heritage, UNESCO Session 2. Why does Cultural Heritage Matter - The Politics of Repatriation Keynote Speakers:· Moira G. Simpson, English and Cultural Studies, Flinders University, Australia· Tom Hill, Former Director, Six Nations Cultural Centre, Canada· Gordon L. Pullar, Director, Department of Alaska Native and Rural Development, University of Alaska, Fairbanks Wednesday 14 February 2007 - Conference Session 3. Ethical Considerations - Repatriation as a Ritual of RedemptionKeynote Speakers: · Georgios A. Voulgarakis, Minister of Culture, Greece · Victoria Tauli Corpuz, Chair, UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Executive Director of Tebtebba Foundation, the Philippines · Jonathan C.H. King, Keeper of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, British Museum, UK· George H.O. Abungu, Heritage Consultant, Okello Abungu Heritage Consultants, Kenya Session 4. Preservation or Reuse - Repatriation as a Challenge to Museums Keynote Speakers:· Te Taru White, Kaihautû, Mâori leader of the Museum of New Zealand, Te Papa Tongarewa· Amareswar Galla, Vice President of ICOM, Director Graduate Studies in Sustainable Heritage Development, The Australian National University· Jack Lohman, Director, Museum of London Group, United Kingdom
Thursday 15 February 2007 - Workshop: Resolution
Friday 16 February 2007 - Departure Day

View the main ICME web page at http://icme.icom.museum

Wednesday, October 04, 2006

A compendium of calls for papers and alerts

Have received a couple of alerts that may be of interest.

From Artline:

DEADLINE FOR REDUCED CONFERENCE RATE - 14 OCTOBER 2006
CHArt TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL CONFERENCE - Booking now open!
KINGS COLLEGE LONDON

FAST FORWARD: Art History, Curation and Practice After Media
Thursday 9 - Friday 10 November 2006

- PROGRAMME - Since its foundation in 1985 CHArt has closely followed the extraordinary developments in arts computing that have taken place over nearly two decades. The twenty-second CHArt conference will reflect upon the unprecedented ways that media, particularly 'new media', are transforming our understanding of the world and of ourselves. The CHArt 2006 program addresses the possibilities and challenges of these changes, as they affect visual culture.

See the conference website for details of programme and booking form: www.chart.ac.uk

Bookings made before 13 October 2006 will be entitled to a discount.

***

From the Ethnomuseums listserv:

New Researchers in Maritime History Conference 2007

At the

National Maritime Museum Cornwall
Discovery Quay
Falmouth
Cornwall

www.nmmc.co.uk

Friday, 9th March and Saturday, 10th March 2007

The fifteenth New Researchers in Maritime History Conference sponsored by the Society for Nautical Research and the British Commission for Maritime History will be hosted by the award winning National Maritime Museum Cornwall.

The conference provides an opportunity for those who have recently become engaged in academic or private research into maritime or naval history to present a paper to a supportive audience of maritime historians and independent scholars

Proposals are invited for 20-minute presentations. Priority will be given to papers based on archive or other primary source material, and to applicants who do not yet have a substantial record of academic publication. Please send an abstract in the form of a one–page summary and another page giving details of the sources utilised. Plus a brief biographical note and contact details, including e-mail address.

Deadline for proposals for papers 10 November 2006
To register an interest in presenting a paper or to ensure you are on the mailing list for this event e-mail mailto:h.r.doe@exeter.ac.uk.uk or write to

Helen Doe
Centre for Maritime Historical Studies
University of Exeter
Amory Building
Rennes Drive
Exeter
Devon EX4 4RJ

All proposals will be considered and will be replied to by email by 30th November.

Sunday, October 01, 2006

Workshop: Books, Scrapbooks and Albums

This might be of interest (something else I received from Art Line today):

Books, Scrapbooks and Albums
A One Day Workshop
Saturday 4 November 2006
10.00-6.00

Convened byThe Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies at the Institute of English Studies, Senate HouseUniversity of London (room ST274/5)

Speakers: Lucy Peltz, Sarah Davison, Brian Maidment, Patrizia di Bello,Vicky Mills, Esther Leslie

Themes: material and visual cultures of books and collecting;extra-illustration or grangerizing; scrapbooking; album-making; binding andunbinding; cutting and pasting; the tactile and visual dimensions of books, scrapbooks, albums; books as collections, paper museums, things;bibliophilia and bibliomania.

Registration: £30; concessions: £20; postgraduates can apply for a subsidy to cover registration

Registration & Registration enquiries: ies@sas.ac.uk Further info:l.cale@bbk.ac.uk

Books, Scrapbooks and Albums
4 November 2006
Institute of English Studies, London (room ST274/5)

Draft Programme

9.30-10.00 Registration

10.00-10.15 Opening Remarks

10.15-12.00 Extra-Illustration
Lucy Peltz (National Portrait Gallery), ŒHydra-Headed Monsters: portrait print collecting and the rise of extra-illustration in the late eighteenthc entury. Sarah Davison (Oxford) on Max Beerbohm's Extra-illustrated books

12.00-12.30 Preliminary perusal of scrapbooks & albums on display. In preparation for this workshop participants are encouraged to read Patriziadi Bellos' article on Mrs Birkbecks' Album (available online at http://www.19.bbk.ac.uk/BackIssuePage.htm)

12.30-1.45 Lunch (own arrangements)

1.45-3.30 Scrapbooking and Album-making
Brian Maidment (Salford), 'Scraps and the Print Trade 1820-1840' Patrizia di Bello (Birkbeck), 'Scrapbooks and albums: visual, tactile and interdisciplinary objects Mike Baron (Birkbeck), ŒResponse: Manuscript albums of the 1820s: a literary perspective

3.30-4.00 Break (further chance to peruse scrapbooks and album)

4.00-5.30 Books in Fiction, Theory, Comic Strip
Vicky Mills (Birkbeck), on Bibliophilia and Bibliomania
Esther Leslie (Birkbeck), ŒFrom Childhood to Hell: Image-Text in Blake,
Benjamin, Alan Moore: Writing in Images

5.30-6.00 Discussion and Conclusion
Dr Patrizia Di Bello LecturerSchool of History of Art, Film and Visual Media

Birkbeck College 43 Gordon SquareLondon WC1 0PD p.dibello@bbk.ac.uk

A bit of light relief


I'm a member of the Association of Art Historian's Art Line listserv and was sent this link in my daily digest email. It's great! Create your own Jackson Pollock masterpiece. Just click and go (tip: a right mouse click changes the paint colour!).

Here's my effort: